Steak Fajita Stir-Fry

Give your stir-fry some Latin flare with this fajita incarnation that is packed with muscle-building protein and the immune-boosting vitamin C found in bell peppers and mango. The stir-fry can also be scooped into corn tortillas for a twist on taco night.

Give your stir-fry some Latin flare with this fajita incarnation that is packed with muscle-building protein and the immune-boosting vitamin C found in bell peppers and mango. The stir-fry can also be scooped into corn tortillas for a twist on taco night.

Preparation

1. Heat a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat. Add 1 Tbsp oil, swirl to coat and place 1 lb. sirloin steak (sliced into thin strips) into pan. Cook for 4 minutes, or until steak is cooked through.

2. Remove steak from wok and add 3 sliced bell peppers (preferably different colors) to pan; cook for 2 minutes, or until just crisp-tender. Return steak to wok along with 2 sliced mangoes and 1 Tbsp fajita seasoning; heat 1 minute. Stir in 1 sliced avocado and juice of 1/2 lime.

3. Serve stir-fry topped with crumble queso fresco and chopped cilantro. Makes 4 servings for an easy weeknight dinner!

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